La Défense, Paris, France 2010

La Défense, Paris, France 2010

women in history - Eleanor of Aquitaine [1122 - 31 March 1204]

Eleanor of Aquitaine was one of the most powerful and wealthiest women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. At age fifteen, she married Louis VII, King of France. At age nineteen, Eleanor and three hundred of her ladies planned to tend to the wounded on location during the Second Crusade—which was met with much criticism from the Church*. However, despite the criticism, she and her ladies dressed in armour and carrying lances (though never actually fighting) rode with her husband Louis VII on the march. Eleanor was not fond of her husband (due to estrangement but more importantly Louis’ conflict with her uncle which whom she was extremely close to) and claimed they were related through some family connections prohibited by the Church and therefore null in the eyes of God, Though she and Louis had two daughters together, the marriage was annulled in 1152. Within a year after the annulment, Eleanor married Henry—who would, in two years time, be crowned Henry II, King of England—who was ten years her junior (and to whom, ironically, she was even more closely related to than her previous husband, Louis VII). Over the next fifteen years, she bore Henry five sons and three daughters. Two of her sons would later famously succeed Henry II: Richard I (Richard Cœur de Lion or Richard the Lionheart) and John I (John Lackland). In 1204 Eleanor died and was entombed in Fontevraud Abbey beside her second husband, Henry II, and her son, Richard the Lionheart, where she still lies today. By the time of her death, Eleanor had outlived all of her children except two… as well as making a remarkable and impressive reputation for herself that would last for centuries to come.

(*In the papal bull for the next Crusade, it expressly forbade women to join the expedition, largely in part due to Eleanor and her three hundred ladies.)

design-is-fine:

Giacomo Fiammingo, Neapolitan cabinet, 1600. Ebony and Ivory. Naples.

The clever system of shelves and drawers was to house the collectables of a chamber of curiosities. Apart from its functional purpose, the cabinet is an artwork in its own right. The ebony carvings present the founders of the four great ancient empires and the deeds of the virtuous hero Hercules. The desktop is engraved with a circular map of the world. Via MKG Hamburg

retrogasm:

Melted and damaged wax figures at Madame Tussauds after a fire. 1925
Would you spend the night with them?

retrogasm:

Melted and damaged wax figures at Madame Tussauds after a fire. 1925

Would you spend the night with them?
red-lipstick:

Edmund Dulac (1882-1953, French born, British naturalized) - The Princess And The Pea, 1911     Paintings

red-lipstick:

Edmund Dulac (1882-1953, French born, British naturalized) - The Princess And The Pea, 1911     Paintings

Wendigo Psychosis is a mental disorder in which a person intensely craves human flesh and thinks they are turning into a cannibal (despite an abundance of healthy food available). The most common response amongst the aboriginal communities in which wendigo psychosis was most prevalent, was curing attempts by traditional native healers or Western doctors. In the unusual cases when these attempts failed, and the Wendigo sufferer began either to threaten those around them or to act violently or anti-socially, they were then generally executed. While some have denied the existence of this disorder, there are a number of credible eyewitness accounts, both by aboriginal communities and by Westerners, that prove that Wendigo psychosis is a factual historical phenomenon.

Wendigo Psychosis is a mental disorder in which a person intensely craves human flesh and thinks they are turning into a cannibal (despite an abundance of healthy food available). The most common response amongst the aboriginal communities in which wendigo psychosis was most prevalent, was curing attempts by traditional native healers or Western doctors. In the unusual cases when these attempts failed, and the Wendigo sufferer began either to threaten those around them or to act violently or anti-socially, they were then generally executed. While some have denied the existence of this disorder, there are a number of credible eyewitness accounts, both by aboriginal communities and by Westerners, that prove that Wendigo psychosis is a factual historical phenomenon.

edwardian-time-machine:

Bat Lalique bat-necklace
Nathalie Clifford Barney
1899
Source

edwardian-time-machine:

Bat Lalique bat-necklace

Nathalie Clifford Barney

1899

Source

venicepearl:

illustrations by Heinrich Leutemann